You can never know

"You can never know what it was truly like", at least that is what I used to tell myself. There is some truth in that, but also, I have used it as an excuse (and you have too,) to protect you, or to protect myself, from feelings that are beyond our everyday experiences. I am telling myself the story, that by saying "you can never know", I do not have to go into the details or feelings, and I also lie to myself, that in some way you will "get" how much I suffered. When I adhere to the notion that "You can never know what it was truly like", and forego the telling, I am making an unconscious agreement to protect people from the past who are guilty of horrors, and to silence a part of myself that is never quite satisfied with being alone with knowledge and feelings that no one should ever experience. When I believe "You can never know what it was truly like", and act on that, I am acting out the despair that I felt during years of isolation as a child, when my only connection was with other victims (my sisters) and the perpetrators of atrocity.

Here are my list of "you can never know"s:

 

You can never know what it is like to be terrified everytime you walk into a room that your parents are in.

You can never know the despair and terror of knowing that at any moment, they could storm up the stairs to your bedroom, not with goodnight wishes and kisses, but with wretching, searing, all powerful, wrathful-god-like violence.

You can never know the burning, dagger-like scrutiny that I experienced with my parents, and the crippling self-consciousness that came from that.

You can never know the ache that comes and threatens to never leave, that tries to tell you that you are unloved and unlovable.

You can never know the lake of ache that comes from years of holding back the tears of imprisoned pain.

But you can never truly know ME if you can't know what it was truly like for me.

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